ACSF Pre-Level 1 Supplement: 2016 version

First…
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acsf-pre-l1-supp

Hot off the press!

The Department of Education has released a new version of the ACSF Pre-Level 1 Supplement.

This new supplement will make it easier for us to meet needs of our learners.  Learners working at pre-level 1 need time to build skills, and usually progress in small steps.  The new pre-level 1 supplement describes these small—and now more recognisable—steps that learners working at pre-level 1 may take towards pre-level 1 exit level.  This will make it easier for us to more accurately identify, develop and report on the capacity of learners at ACSF pre-level 1, and identify ways to link from pre-level 1 to higher ACSF levels.

Make sure you access the 2016 DET updated version, rather than the previous PDF version

What’s new about this version?

The new ACSF Pre-Level Supplement offers, for each core skill, the same sections and structure as the 5 LLN core skills levels 1 to 5. This includes…

“… a detailed set of Indicators, Focus Areas, Performance Features and Sample Activities by which learner core skill gains can be determined and reported.”

(Department of Education and Training 2016 ACSF Pre-Level 1 Supplement, p1)

Stages are new!

At first glance, it may seem that the pre-level 1 information in this new supplement is presented in the same way as for core skill levels 1 to 5.  But this isn’t quite true.

For the first time, the new ACSF Pre-Level 1 Supplement describes two stages of progress—Stage A and Stage B—to represent the incremental progress learners may make.

The table below explains how each core skill is described in the new ACSF Pre-Level 1 Supplement:

Indicators Indicators are provided for each core skill.

Most of these start with, “Begins to …”

Focus Areas The focus areas that learners are likely to be able to demonstrate have Performance Features included.
Performance Features Performance features now describe two stages of skill development—Stage A and Stage B.
Sample Activities Sample activities are not divided into the three Communication Domains.  This is because at this level learners will need to develop their skills from highly familiar, personally relevant, and immediate contexts.

Sample activities for Stages A and B are provided.

Variables One set of variables applies to both stages.
Here’s an example

The example below shows Pre-Level 1 Writing Indicator 0.05: Begins to produce basic written text Performance Descriptions – stages A and B:

pre-level-1-3

Why should we bother using this Pre-Level 1 Supplement?

SBS’s Insight program recently aired an episode called Reading Between the Lines (first aired on 23/9/2016), which highlighted the challenges some adult learners face with developing LLN and foundation skills.

reading-between-the-lines

This episode is an important reminder of the many people in our communities who may have limited LLN/foundation skills but who sincerely want to participate successfully in today’s world. We have a responsibility to do what we can to facilitate this.

We feel that this new Pre-Level 1 Supplement will help us identify a way forward.

Extra reading… preparing pre-level 1 instruction or assessment activities

  • The Pre-Level 1 Supplement offers good practice approaches (within the Theoretical Underpinnings section, page 1)
  • The Performance Features  and Sample activities for each LLN core skill  provide a range of skills and activities that are highly useful to preparing instruction and assessment strategies and approaches
  • If you want to see some examples of instruction or assessment tasks, have a look at the  Precision Consultancy ACSF validated tools. Two examples are shown here.
Example 1:  Making numbers work

pre-l1-numeracy-eg-1

Example 2: Make a Sling

pre-l1-reading-eg1

Focus on formative assessment to build foundation skills

Formative Assessment

For this post, the Formative assessment refers to  the training stage sandwiched between Diagnostic assessment and Summative assessment. The stage of training where learners generally practise the foundation skills used to perform the workplace task.

Training Phase

Type of foundation skills assessment

Pre-training, or start of training Diagnostic assessment: check for learners’ existing foundation skills
During training
Formative assessment: check learners’ progress with learning how to perform the foundation skills embedded in the workplace task. Assessment for learning.
Completion of training Summative assessment: assess competency to perform the foundation skills embedded within the workplace task.  Assessment of learning.
The benefits of formative assessment to Build learners’ foundation

A typical training program follows the pattern:

  1. instructions about the workplace task (and the underpinning foundation skills)
  2. activities to practise the foundation skills required to perform the workplace task
  3. assess the learners’ competency to perform the workplace task with the embedded foundation skills

For learners who commence with enough workplace and foundation skills knowledge, this process may be sufficient.

But, if you have learners who:

  • are new to the workplace skill, or embedded foundation skill (Novice performer)
  • have some prior experience with the skills, but are unsure  (Advanced Beginner)
  • may need some skill revision, or a prompt to perform independently (Capable performer)

……… then, how will you know the instruction is sufficient to enable the learners to perform  independently and confidently at the time of final assessment.

For both trainers and learners it is valuable to find out as soon as possible, if learners need:

  • re-direction with ‘how-to’
  • revisiting strategies or resources
  • alternative strategies or approaches
  • alternative resources or support

……………to build foundation skills.

Adult learners:

  • can easily go off-track
  • may need to ‘un-do’ or re-learn a strategy, concept, or understanding
  • will benefit from confirmation of their approach
  • seek timely feedback

Formative assessment:

  • enables trainers to check the strength of instruction (‘how to’  …) and support strategies
  • enables the learners’ to become active participants in the learning process.

Think about ………….the implications of assuming learners are developing the necessary foundation skills, and don’t check?

We recommend an active and planned approach: Make formative assessment a priority…………..
1 implement an Assess to Learn approach

Assess Learn cycle_learningfirst.org.aublog05022016 Develop a feedback-driven learning environment where you are tuned-in to the foundation skills progress made by the learners and use this to influence the guidance and the instruction you provide, or the delivery plan overall.

  • Assesses learners’ needs – what are the learners’ skills, what do they need to learn ‘how to do’ now?
  • Select the strategies and approaches to develop the learners’ foundation skills
  • Evaluatethrough formative assessment –  the effectiveness: check progress, understanding, confidence to perform the task independently What progress have learners made?

Think about …….. how might formative assessment influence your instruction approaches to build foundation skills?

2  Where possible, stretch the Practice phase out

Formative assessment cropped

‘Dip-into’ learners’ foundation skills progress during the ‘practice’ stage of delivery. Build into the practice stage frequent opportunities to capture what learners CAN do, and the  challenges they face. Be open to their reflective comments.

The benefits of collaborative activity

“Beware of the lonely learner: they are at risk of making less progress”

Denise Meyerson  2016 , Emerging Trends in Learning ACPET webinar

For learners: Working with others or responding to the thoughts and ideas of others helps to shape the learning and provides an ‘informal’ formative assessment.

For trainers: Providing feedback to a group is effective and impacts all learns involved – it may also be less time -consuming.

Think about ………when are the timely opportunities to check in with learners as they practise the foundation skills independently, or with others?

3 Tune-in to learner’s skill development, some suggested etools

Some etools to assist formative assessment:

Other approaches: 53 Ways to check for understanding
4 make the check in worthwhile for you and the learner

The type of feedback can make the difference between the learner moving forward or not.

  1. Accessed from www.freeimages.com under creative commons licence 8/8/16
    Accessed from http://www.freeimages.com under creative commons license 8/8/16

    Clarify steps, reveal the foundation skill nuances for this workplace context, expose common mistakes, or misunderstandings.

  2. Confirm progress, strengths and what’s needed
  3. Construct clear benchmarks/checklists/rubrics with what is expected or required

 

If you are interested in:

How to build LLN assessment into VET training (including formative assessment):

  • join us as we deliver a webinar via Velg on 30 August, 2016.
  • contact us to answer your questions

 

 

 

 

 

Pitching tasks to intended foundation skills: 6 suggestions

Aligning instruction and assessment tasks to a specific foundation skill level is relevant to each phase of learners’ engagement with training.

Prior to training or early into training

During the teaching and learning

Summative assessment at completion

Prepare tasks to identify  foundation skills the learner CAN demonstrate?

Use the information to identify the learners’ foundation skill needs

Prepare tasks to build and support learners’ foundation skill development.

Prepare tasks to enable learners’ to reveal foundation skills progress.

Use the information to consider what  strategies effective ir not effective.

Prepare tasks to enables the learners to demonstrate competency at the required  foundation skills and knowledge?

Use the information to determine successful or not successful assessment results or course completion.

Accessed from http://www.freeimages.com/ 13/3/16
Accessed from http://www.freeimages.com/ 13/3/16

Aligning, targeting or pitching – this can be an overlooked step

If you aim to identify, instruct or assess a specific core skill at a particular level of competency, then the outcome will be enhanced if there is regard to aligning the task (stimuli and instructions) to the intended foundation skill.

Foundation skills refers to both:

  • LLN – Australian Core Skills Framework ACSF
  • Employability skills –  Core Skills for Work Developmental Framework (CSfW)

Whilst some units of competency state very clearly the LLN (ACSF) or Employability skills (CSfW) level, many do not. The progress is interrupted by the recent cessation of the Industry Skills Councils and transition to Industry Reference Groups and Skills Services Organisations.

For many trainers, having regard for the ACSF or CSfW is necessary.

Wherever the starting point – identify, instruct, or assess – a task is involved. 

Stimuli:

  • Sets the scene – what is this about
  • Initiates the first thoughts – what do I know about this?
  • Example: Read…., Listen ….., Watch ….

Instructions:

  • Advise the learner what to do to demonstrate performance of the skill or knowledge
  • Examples: Explain,  …….Demonstrate, ……. Produce ….
http://www.freeimages.com/ 14/3/16
http://www.freeimages.com/ 14/3/16

Why is it important to pitch the task at the required foundation skill level? Who/What is impacted?

 If the stimuli and instructions are not aligned to the foundation skill and level:

The learners

The trainer

The RTO

  • The learners’ capacity to demonstrate what they CAN do, is at risk
  • The learners may not be assisted with appropriate strategies and support to build necessary skills
  • Competency at the training demand (AQF and foundation skill)  is compromised
  • Incorrect assumptions may be made about learners’ competency
  • Feedback, suggested strategies, and resources may be off-track to learners’ needs
  • Formative and summative assessment that informs planning and delivery – what’s working and what’s not – is compromised.
  • Instruction and assessment tasks may not meet the training benchmark – validation may be at risk
  • Awarded results may be invalid

Pitching to the intended core skill and level may take some practice; six suggestions

1  Take a closer look at the stimuli and instructions, ask the following questions:

Is the task pitched higher or lower than the training demand?

  • Does the stimuli content align with the learners’ reading competency?
  • Does the stimuli context align with the core skill level to be assessed?
  • Is the stimuli an authentic workplace document or have authentic workplace relevancy?
  • Are the targeted core skills required to engage with the stimuli?

  • Are the instructions written to enable most learners to access them?
  • Do the instructions require the intended skill to be used at the intended level?
  • Have the instructions been trialled for effectiveness?
  • Does the task enable the learner to reveal competency with the specific performance features  of the skill and level?

2 Refer to the ACSF

  • The Performance Variables (pge 5) describe the factors that will influence performance at any one time: context complexity, text complexity, task complexity and the level of assumed support or independence expected. The document includes a one page chart showing the four Performance Variables across the 5 ACSF levels. Each core skill and levels also states the associated Performance Variables. The performance variables provide a useful quick reference guide, but you may want to check other sections to be sure.
  • Sample Activities for each core skill and level are provided as a guide. Check out the activities suggested in the Education and Training, Workplace and Employment domains. Are there similarities to what you aim to identify, Instruct, assess?
  • The core skill level Indicators may offer support to your decision, although they may not reveal sufficient information
  • Specific details can be found in the  core skill Focus Area and Performance Features. Some trainers find the Performance Features Grids in the Appendices a helpful section as the Performance Features for each core skill across the five levels are located together.

3 Refer to the CSfW

  • The document provides a table titled Generic Descriptions of Stages of Performance across the five stages of development (Novice to Advanced performer) in a broad summary format.
  • The Skill Clusters:
    • Navigate the world of work
    • Interact with others
    • Get the work Done
  • AND the Skill Areas (10 of these) may help to locate the type and level of  employability skill you are aiming to identify, instruct or assess.  There is a table that combines the Skills Clusters and the Skills Area,, explaining what each of the skills is ‘about’.
  • The Focus Areas state the range of employability skills that align with the Skills Areas.
  • The description of the performance behaviour for each Focus Area and Stage of Development is located within the Performance Features tables. This reveals the specifics.
  • The CSfW includes Influencing Factors, which, are broader than the 4 ACSF Performance Variables. Like the ACSF Performance Variables, the Influencing factors have the potential to impact performance at any point in time. But unlike the ACSF, the Influencing Factors are not aligned in the Skills Clusters or Focus Areas by Stages of Development.

4 Refer to examples where you can see tasks (Stimuli and instructions) validated by industry specialists:

  • Precision Consultancy ACSF resources
  • The Manufacturing Skills Australia site continues to retain the foundation skills resources. There are literacy and numeracy indicator tools (updated in 2015). The resources include the questions mapping to the ACSF. You will need to create a login to the site (accessed 15/3/16).
  • Foundation Skills Assessment Tool (FSAT)  – is on the horizon, and will be freely available. The tool (developed by ACER) is designed to identify and assess foundation skill capacity. The tool is based on performance features of both the ACSF (LLN) and the CSfW (Employability skills) Watch out for the release of this tool

5 Become observant at Assessment Validation professional development either within or external to your RTO

  • Does the validation include explicit checking that the task stimuli and instructions align with the intended LLN skill and level?

6 Participate in formal/informal professional development

  • Adult Learning Australia have a Linked in Adult Literacy Network. Using a webinar platform, the ALA offer opportunities for members who want to submit tasks for validation against the ACSF, The sessions are presented by Philippa McLean; a key contributor to writing the ACSF. Validated tools are then stored and available for others in the network to access.
  • Connect with like-minded peers/colleagues. Is there a network available that is open to informal discussion, information sharing, and reflecting on effectiveness?
  • Ask Chemène or I via this website, or send an email to llnandvetmeetingplace@gmail.com, or give us a call (phone numbers in the right column near the top.

How can digital skills support foundation skills?

accessed under creative commons license from https://images.unsplash.com/photo-1439219970881-3727d2e3402a?q=80&fm=jpg&s=892a23f2aff428670fb78e821072b97d

We know the digital world will continue to influence our lives into the future. We also know there is a vast array of digital tools and applications useful to the training context. Keeping abreast of developments and possibilities is a challenge.

There are so many possible links, examples and tools that there was risk of the content and quantity becoming overwhelming. The aim is to suggest online and e-tools, ways of using them, strategies and case study examples etc. that would have potential for supporting highly diverse students in a Foundations Skills context – it is not about how Foundation Skills practitioners could create “one-size-fits-all” courses, nor is it about testing students to determine individual needs. Finding solutions to support Foundation Skills development is not formulaic so the intention is to provide a range of examples, tools and ideas to enable practitioners to dip in and try things that resonate with them and/or their students.

Flexible Learning E-Standards for training Foundation Skills Toolkit introduction.

If you are:

  • interested in using digital tools, and are unsure where to start?
  • looking for more digital learning tips and strategies?
  • watching your learners using digital tools, and you want to build on that platform?
  • pondering which tools could support which foundation skills?

Then, have a look at:

  • this eWorks article could be just what you need to kick start or reinvigorate digital activity
  • a webinar series : Teaching Tips to build your learners’ foundation skills (digital strategies included)
  • the popplet clusters tools into three groups; for collaboration with and between learners , for gathering feedback, and for presentation
  • technology assisted links at Resource Links, Teaching Strategies 2 on this site

You may have ideas and feedback about strategies you have tried – share them with others  by adding a comment to this post.

Adult Learners’ Week 2015 – Unlocking Learning

 Get ready. The time to celebrate is almost here.

ALW2015_20yearsSeptember signals two United Nations (UNESCO) endorsed celebrations; Adult Learners’ Week and International Literacy Day. It’s a time to promote the opportunities you offer to enable adults to continue to learn. It’s also time to celebrate their achievements. 2015 is a twenty year milestone for Australian Adult Learner’s Week Celebrations.

 

What is the purpose? What is celebrated? adl ild

The 2015 theme: Unlocking Learning

I remember a song by The Whitlams – Keep the Light On – with these words that neatly express the challenges we and the adult learners sometimes face in the challenge and goal to search for the key to unlock learning:

We stumble into each other’s lives and we knock some things over, Try not to make a sound, Each time you reach out, a new shout or shine-on, We run in and fall out, fumble around for the key ………….

Purchased from Stocksy 4/8/15
Purchased from Stocksy 4/8/15

 

Regardless of the adult learners’ age, or the teaching context, it is a privilege to facilitate adult learning.

 

 

 

If you’d like strategies and ideas to unlock learning and build learners’ literacy (foundation skills), then you might like to:

  • participate in the LLN and VET Meeting Place Teaching Tips to build your learners’ foundation skills Webinar series.
  • communicate with a Foundation Skills Champion in your state, or a similar workplace context. The National Foundation Skills Strategy Project provides details.
  • ask questions and obtain ideas on the FS Teach Facebook group.

Participate in Adult Learners’ Week

If you’d like to find out more about, or be involved with Adult Learner’s Week, then you might like to:

 

 

 

 

 

Overcoming the first sentence syndrome

accessed from https://download.unsplash.com/1/irish-hands.jpg 210715 under creative commons license

Writing can be hard work, especially getting started. Finding  the words to write the first sentence can pose a challenge and potentially block the flow of ideas and actions to complete the writing task.

Start a sentence v2The first sentence provides the expectation of what’s next, or indicates what the text is about. The audience (reader) refers to the style, complexity, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary as clues to gain meaning. Learners can stumble at this important writing stage.

How can we assist learners to overcome the first sentence syndrome?

If your learners need to write –reports, procedures, policies, business letters, abstracts, conclusions, introductions, summaries, emails, personal journals, opinion pieces, WHS reports, narrative pieces, blog posts, learning reflections …………and they are challenged to get started, then providing focused and direct scaffolding can enable learners to progress independently.

It’s easy to assume that scaffolding writing skill is usually necessary for learners with limited foundation skills capacity and higher level learners don’t need this type of support. When faced with writing an unfamiliar text type, learners may feel like a Novice, or Advanced Beginner (CSfW) uncertain about how to get started. Regardless of the text type and complexity, learners appreciate knowing how to approach writing for the intended purpose.

If you are introducing new writing genres or text types, reveal:

  • the text purpose and audience: what message is intended, and who will be reading this?
  • the text type: what is the expected vocabulary, language and text format?

Encourage learners to:

  • spend time planning (key points, heading sub-headings): gathering ideas or specific information, and locating resources
  • edit and rearrange their writing: know it is normal to redraft, many writers visit and revisit
7 Sentence Writing Strategies

The following strategies:

  1. can be used within different text types and complexity.
  2. adapt to different delivery models and web-based tools.
  3. support foundation skill development across ACSF and CSfW levels.
  4. are accessed from different sources:
  • Teaching Adults to Write to Communicate: located on this site in the Resource Links Teaching Strategies  (page 2)
  • QCAL Tutor Tips:  located on this site in the Resource Links Teaching Strategies  (Page 1)
  • Gelman, H. Everyone can write: A Guide to get you started  (book details see below)
Strategy
Source

Running Dictionary. A skill building activity featuring relevant grammar , punctuation or vocabulary features.

For a detailed description, access QCAL Tutor Tip Running Writing

Sentence Soapbox. Learners individually write a sentence for a specific purpose. Sentences are redistributed anonymously, read, shared and edited by peers.  

 For a detailed description, access QCAL Tutor Tips Sentence Soapbox

A shared (or guided) approach to writing. This enables the trainer to discuss and model writing strategies as the learners try independently.

 For a detailed description, access Teaching Adults to Write to Communicate, page 28.

Provide a writing frame.  For example ask questions, or provide a short description of what should be included within the sentence.

. For a detailed description, access Teaching Adults to Write to Communicate, page 31

Provide example sentence starters for different text types.

Gelman, H. (2014) Everyone can write: A guide to get you started Exisle Publishing PTY Ltd

Build Word Maps. Explore learners’ known relevant vocabulary, introduce new vocabulary, demonstrate linkages, antonyms, synonyms.

  For a detailed description, access Teaching Adults to Write to Communicate, page 36.

Encourage learners to collect samples of opening sentences for particular text types or text sections. These can be shared, building a group collection or resource.

Gelman, H. (2014) Everyone can write: A guide to get you started. Exisle Publishing Pty Ltd

Building foundation skills through vocational training: first steps

 

If developing learners’ foundation skills is important to you or your RTO, this post will give you:

  • some practical ways to get started, and

  • links to information about our forthcoming workshop titled:

“Build it in: How to merge foundation skill development with adult education and training”

 7th August 2015, in Sydney.

Access the details here or download the workshop flyer

Before we start, if you are new to foundation skills, background information about the national agenda and the current foundation skills description, is available here.

Focusing on foundation skills within training is a National Foundation Skills Strategy for Adults priority..

Building foundation skills through vocational training:  fact vs myth

VET ad FS togetherMyth: By teaching the vocational task (e.g. hairdressing), all learners build competence in both the vocational task and in the foundation skills needed to perform that task.

Fact: To develop foundation skills, some learners need explicit foundation skill-building strategies merged into vocational programs

So what are explicit foundation skill-building strategies?

The key word here is, ‘explicit’.  To be explicit is to be proactive and make foundation skill development in our vocational training both obvious and

highly visible

… i.e. explicit.

We can’t just hope that if we concentrate on teaching the vocational task, foundation skills will come. They may, but with many learners they may not.

How can I get started?

To get started, adopt a dual-delivery focus to your vocational training programs.  Focus on:

  1. How to build vocational skill – e.g. ability to cut hair, AND
  2. How to build the foundation skills needed to perform the skill at work – e.g. speaking and listening skills needed to converse with clients while cutting hair; numeracy skills needed to calculate the bill for the hair treatment.

Devise training strategies that cover both vocational skill and foundation skills.

Here’s a 2 step process to consider

  1. Explore the training content foundation skills

  2. Explore how you can reveal the foundation skills ‘how to do it’ steps’

1    Explore the training content foundation skills

What do the learners need to do?

Look at the task from a different perspective. Instead of focusing on the task only from the perspective of the what you intend to deliver, align your reflection towards the foundation skills and ask, when the learners do this, what will they actually need to do? What skills or knowledge are involved with this task?

For example, what is involved with:

  • recording case notes?
  • developing spreadsheets?
  • completing this project?
  • costing electrical installation?
  • analysing policy documents?
  • preparing a speech?

Ask, what will the learners actually need to do to complete the tasks? What skills and knowledge are involved to be able to perform that task? If you find examples helpful, here are some resources describing foundation skills within a mix of industry, and government roles.

2    Explore how to reveal the ‘how to do it’ steps

You may think it’s obvious, but for many learners the foundation skill ‘how to do it’ steps are invisible. It may feel odd, or uncomfortable, but finding your voice, or a resource, that reveals the foundation skill ‘how-to-do-it’, can make all the difference to learners really ‘getting it’ and being able to apply, and transfer the foundation skills, or not.

Tasks seem so natural to us, we forget that we have a subset of procedures, strategies, specific skills and knowledge enabling us to do the task so seamlessly. Have the Australian Core Skills Framework (ACSF) and Core Skills for Work (CSfW) easily accessible. The performance descriptions will help to clarify what is involved – the skills and knowledge.

Locate resources that reveal the skills and knowledge involved. For example this Youtube focus shows and explains the fundamentals of  writing a paragraph. The Queensland Council of Adult Literacy Tutor Tips provide a range of foundation skill ‘how to do it’ strategies for trainers. For example, if your learners need to develop report writing skills this report writing pdf reveals the structure, features, purposes of this text type.

The workshop details again …

If you would like to know more about building foundation skills through vocational training, then check out our workshop…

“Build it in: How to merge foundation skill development with adult education and training”

 7th August 2015, in Sydney.

Access the details here or download the workshop flyer

ACER 2015 NALLNAC Conference: ‘take-aways’ and reflections

 

 WordItOut-word-cloud-875743

Ann and Chemène (we) attended and co-presented at ACER‘s National Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy Conference (NALLNAC) held in Adelaide on 14 and 15 May 2015.

We got a lot from the conference and wanted to share our reflections and insights in this post.

Summary

This was not the first year we have attended NALLNAC, and this year we were pleased to see even more workshops dedicated to helping VET practitioners assess LLN skills and build foundation skill development into vocational training:

  • Chemène relished the chance to hear from foundation skill ‘gurus’ such as Philippa MacLean (writer of the ACSF), Dave Tout (Numeracy Guru and NALLNAC organiser), and Ros Bauer (Australian Training Awards Winner – Excellence in Adult Language Literacy Numeracy Practice Award), just to name three.
  • Ann re-united with long-standing LLN colleagues and networked with VET practitioners to learn more about the challenges and opportunities presented when incorporating foundation skills into VET.

This conference truly offered a meeting place between LLN and VET practitioners.  Thank you to the 2015 ACER National Adult Language Literacy and Numeracy Conference team for this opportunity.

Our workshop

Our workshop was called,

Within VET Training, where are the opportunities to EMBED (Explore Moments to Bring Explicit LLN Development into VET)?

As luck would have it, ACER scheduled our workshop for the last time slot on the last day of the conference.  So, we were prepared to deliver to a small, tired group.  Instead, we were delighted by a large group of motivated and energetic LLN and VET professionals who were prepared to share experiences and ideas.

It’s hard for VET practitioners to get started or make progress building learners’ foundation skills within VET–trainers know their training content, and prepare to deliver it effectively. So how can building foundation skills fit within the time available?

Our workshop aimed to help VET practitioners do just that:  to identify ways to monitor, support and build Foundation Skills within vocational training sessions.

We used a case study as the basis for group discussions.  We gave participants:

  • an example of a vocational session plan (a real example, donated by a skilled and very nice trainer we know).
  • a profile of a typical learner group for this session.

Participants worked in small groups to identify ways to adapt training delivery so that in addition to covering vocational content, the session delivery could also:

  • Support learners
  • Upskill learners and help them build foundation skills
  • Monitor foundation skill development.

Although the suggestions focus on foundation skill development, the vocation or workplace content remained at the forefront.

So what ideas did participants come up with?  See for yourself!

We collated the ideas participants came up with in a post-conference takeaway pdf resource.  We also added a few ideas of our own.  Participant ideas were so good that we thought we’d make it available to anyone wanting to get ideas for how to build foundation skills within vocational education sessions.  We hope you find it useful and welcome your feedback.

DOWNLOAD RESOURCE HERE

ACER 2015 NALLNAC Conference Reflections

NALLNAC left us reminded of, exposed to, and encouraged by the array of authors, papers, reports and workshops with impacting messages about LLN development in Australia.

The following comments and links are also relevant to the current national foundation skills agenda, each with a focus on the trainer/teacher. The authors either remind us that how and what we do are critical to learner outcomes, or suggest there are stages and phases progressed as we integrate LLN into VET training.

1    We were reminded of:

For example, The US Gordon Commission’s paper, To Assess, To Teach, To Learn: A Vision for the Future of Assessment, reminded us that where Foundation Skills are concerned, critical to progress is assessing the needs and capacity first, then implementing a continuous loop of teaching, reflecting, feedback and assessing. The key take-away teaching model Assess, Teach, Learn fits harmoniously with building learner foundation skills where knowing current learner capacity is the starting point.

2    We were exposed to:

For example, the Les Retford Integrating LLN into VET Practice research findings  expose perspectives of  VET practitioners as they transition towards embracing foundation skills within VET teaching. The spiral metaphor (image) suggests that trainers progress through five stages: commencing with awareness and progressing towards influencing practice. If you support VET trainers , be mindful that the journey is a challenge and consider the support available.

3    We are encouraged by:

Revisiting two ‘gems’. For exmple,  John Hattie’s Visible Learning ranked teaching and learning approaches that affect learning. Hattie’s emphasise on the teacher as the change agent, and teaching from the perspective of the learner can’t be overlooked.

Also, Dr. Jackie Gerstein’s Growth Mindset has become a popular model for educators and reminds us that if we have the Growth Mindset we will be prepared to continuously adapt and grow as educators, and therefore achieve better results.

Teaching is a work in progress.